Texas Losing Billions Over Medicaid Expansion Refusal, Study Says

By choosing not to expand Medicaid, Texas will lose an estimated $9.58 billion in federal funding in 2022, a new report says.

“States often seek to increase their share of federal funds, lobbying for military bases, procurement contracts, and highway funds,” researchers wrote. “Federal funding provides direct benefits and bolsters local economies. …Even states that do not value the health and health system benefits of expanding Medicaid may value the expansion as a source of funds that benefits the state economy.”

The study was conducted by the Commonwealth Fund, a foundation whose mission is to “promote a high performing healthcare system that achieves better access, improved quality, and greater efficiency, particularly for society’s most vulnerable.”

State officials have resisted Medicaid expansion, saying the expansion would leading to soaring state costs down the road. Medicaid currently covers 3.6 million Texans. Taking into account federal taxes paid by Texas residents, the net cost to taxpayers in the state in 2022 will be more than $9.2 billion.

The pattern repeats in non-expanding states nationwide. Florida’s decision to not participate will cost its taxpayers more than $5 billion in 2022. In Georgia, the state will forgo $4.9 billion in federal funding without the expansion of Medicaid, and in turn, $2.8 billion will flow out of the state in 2022.

8 comments on “Texas Losing Billions Over Medicaid Expansion Refusal, Study Says

  1. Pingback: Texas Losing Billions by Refusing Medicaid Expansion | FrontBurner | D Magazine

  2. Commonwealth Fund is nothing but a progressive cheerleader. From their own report:

    “The Commonwealth Fund marshaled its resources this year to produce timely and rigorous work that helped lay the groundwork for the historic Affordable Care Act, signed by President Obama”

    There are very obvious economic reasons for refusing the expansion.

    Reply
  3. And don’t forget all the money and jobs we are missing out on by not doing our own ACA marketplace. Millions of dollars that would have gone to computer programmers, phone folks, advertisers, media outlets, and on and on. Instead, all that money is going to the feds.

    Reply
  4. additional links pointing out the liberal bias of the Commonwealth fund
    http://healthblog.ncpa.org/commonwealth-ranking-are-we-really-19th-out-of-19/

    “The liberal Commonwealth Fund is at it again, releasing today a new study, “Health Care in the 2012 Presidential Election: How the Obama and Romney Plans Stack Up.” But the “study” is, in a word, nonsense.

    The crucial sentence in the publication is this one: “Because Romney has not yet fleshed out the details of [his health reform] proposals, a set of assumptions was made.” That is a significant understatement.”
    http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/328988/commonwealth-fund-makes-it-again-grace-marie-turner

    “Typical of the Commonwealth Fund is a recent study claiming that the U.S. health care system ranks last when compared with seven industrialized countries. It’s just the latest in a string of policy studies from organizations that want to see a European-style, government-run health care system brought to these shores. Democratic politicians and their allies then use those studies to bolster the case for dramatic reforms.”
    http://www.ideasinactiontv.com/tcs_daily/2010/08/last-in-credibility-the-liberal-campaign-to-discredit-american-health-care-1.html

    this whole posting sounds more like a reedit of a Commonwealth Fund press release

    Reply
  5. Think of all the lost job’s in health care with the lost of billions in Texas.All this money goes to health care providers so why would Rick Perry refuse this money and jobs.Does Perry and Tea Party think this helps Texas, we will pay the federal tax any way it will be used by other State’s who do expand their Medicaid .

    Reply

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