Trial About Fetal Remains Burial and Cremation Kicks Off

In 2017, Texas legislators passed Senate Bill 8, requiring hospitals to bury or cremate fetal remains. Monday, a Federal courtroom in Austin played host to the opening day of a trial pitting state attorneys versus reproductive rights attorneys, as the Texas Tribune reports. A similar rule by the Texas Department of State Health Services was axed by a U.S. District Judge in 2017, prompting the legislation. The Trib sums up the opposition to such a rule: Abortion opponents have argued that the rule was a means to bring human dignity to the fetuses, while reproductive rights advocates said it was another… Full Story

More Details on Texas Health’s Planned Hospital in Mansfield

Texas Health Resources’ hospital in Mansfield will be a joint venture with Florida-based Adventist Health System. It’ll cost $150 million and be called Texas Health Hospital Mansfield. Texas Health provided the extra details about its plans late last week, after reports earlier this month on the Mansfield City Council’s approval. THR and Adventist have collaborated on hospitals previously, including 356-bed Texas Health Huguley Hospital Fort Worth South. Adventist is one of the largest not-for-profit health systems in the U.S., with nearly 50 hospital campuses. The nuts and bolts, if you missed them: This will be a four-story, 83-bed campus encompassing… Full Story

It’s Time To Submit Your Nominations For D CEO’s Fifth Annual Excellence In Healthcare Awards

For the fifth year running, D CEO and D CEO Healthcare will be honoring the area’s outstanding industry leaders and innovative projects with our Excellence in Healthcare Awards. As of Monday, nominations are open. Go! Go! Go! Our finalists will find a prominent slot in the December issue of D CEO, and we’ll reveal the winners at an event that same month. These awards span the spectrum, and we’re asking for nominations from the largest healthcare systems to the independents, and from CEOs down to volunteers. The categories: • Outstanding Healthcare Executive • Outstanding Healthcare Practitioner • Achievement in Healthcare Innovation • Achievement in… Full Story

Join Us For A D CEO Healthcare Breakfast Panel Featuring CEOs From Baylor, Texas Health, Methodist, and StratiFi

The area’s healthcare needs are expanding as North Texas booms. Meanwhile, tech and regulation have ushered in an era in which more and more medicine is practiced on an outpatient rather than an inpatient basis. This puts providers trying to figure out where to park their profits at a crossroads: Should they invest in expanding large hospitals—seeing the growing populations—or move into smaller communities with more focused models of care? We’ve already seen a wide, creative mix from the major health systems of North Texas. At an upcoming D CEO Healthcare Breakfast Panel, we’ll gather a few of their chief executives… Full Story

Dallas County Has Its First West Nile Case of 2018

Dallas County Health and Human Services announced this week that the area has its first human case of West Nile Virus of the season, coming from Irving’s 75061 zip code. This is about par for the course, timing-wise. The county reported a first positive test within mosquito samples from a trap collected on May 29. To avoid West Nile, DHCCS suggests using DEET-containing or other EPA approved mosquito repellents, wearing clothing that covers, not letting water stand, and limiting time out around dusk and dawn.

One Of The Forest Park Co-Founders Owns The 52nd-Priciest Home In Dallas

I mentioned this on Twitter this week, but I find it interesting enough to point out here, as well: Forest Park Medical Center co-founder Wade Barker made an appearance on D Magazine’s 100 Most Expensive Homes in Dallas list. At just about $12.5 million, his humble lair ranks No. 52, with 11 fireplaces tucked into 16,000 square feet. That feature, put together by D Editor Tim Rogers, is here. Barker was one of 21 people indicted in the massive kickback scheme at now-bankrupt Forest Park, the fallout from which continues to work itself out in the courts. Another pin fell last… Full Story

Baylor Scott & White Has A New Board Chair

The Baylor Scott & White Holdings Board of Trustees has a new chair. Ross McKnight, a businessman who has made fortunes in oil and banking, took over the role on July 1. McKnight was named chair-elect in 2015 and most recently served as chair of the finance and investment committee. He takes over after previous chair Jim Turner’s three-year term expired. McKnight has been on the board since it was formed by the merger in 2013. He served on the Scott & White Healthcare Board of Trustees for 11 years prior to that. “Ross has been invaluable in supporting Baylor… Full Story

UNT Health Science Center Names A Provost

The UNT Health Science Center has named a new provost and executive vice president of academic affairs, promoting the dean of the system’s college of pharmacy to the position. Dr. Charles Taylor will take on the role starting Aug. 1. He will serve as the chief academic officer and oversee and align budgetary policies and priorities. Prior Provost Thomas Yorio stepped down in 2016 following 40 years with UNTHSC. Claire Peel, vice provost of academic research and dean of the school of health professions, has been serving as the interim provost since then. Taylor has packed a lot into his… Full Story

WFAA: North Texas Couple Mulling Over Divorce To Qualify For Medicaid

WFAA ran a story this week that speaks to the country’s billowing healthcare costs. Maria and Jake Grey, residents of Sanger, are considering getting a divorce so that Maria can qualify for Medicaid as a jobless, single mother of two. Jake makes about $40,000, and as it stands, the family doesn’t qualify. That makes it difficult to pay for what they need to care for their six-year-old daughter Brighton, who has a developmental disability. The couple also has a two-year-old. Although the Grey’s have insurance—the story doesn’t get into what kind—they pay $15,000 a year out of pocket to care… Full Story

Hospital Systems Are Rushing To Plant Sports Medicine Investments in Collin County

Near the end of the first set of a close volleyball match in January, Alexis James, a young, sought-after recruit from Frisco, called for a “three” set, meaning a quick set toward the inside portion of Alexis’ position. What came instead looked more like a “hut,” a set that shoots out toward the antenna located at the end of the net. Alexis made a quick adjustment but came down awkwardly on her left leg. Raised by a football-coach father, she shook it off and kept playing. It wasn’t until two weeks later—after insistence by her club-team coaches that she was fine,… Full Story