How to Make Healthcare Pricing Transparent

It’s difficult for consumers—and employers—to consider costs when making treatment decisions. There is little doubt price transparency is a must-do for the U.S. healthcare system. One in four Americans struggled to pay medical bills in 2012, and one in 10 said they could not pay medical bills at all. Full Story

Facing an Uncertain Future, Physicians Increasingly Throw in the Towel

As the healthcare landscape changes, do the economics of a solo physician practice even work anymore? Only 1 out of 4 physicians say they plan to continue practicing as they are, while half said they plan to exit the traditional full-time independent private-practice model. Here are some of the drivers pushing the changes physicians are facing. Full Story

How Physicians Overcome The Challenges of Myriad Guidelines, Lack of Time

The administrative burden on today’s physician practice, coupled with increasing medical complexity, inevitably spills over into patient care. For every 100 Medicare patients, a typical primary-care physician interacts with 99 other doctors in 53 practices. The chance that a primary-care visit will result in a referral nearly doubled between 1999 and 2009. Full Story

Is Insurance Bureaucracy Lengthening Physician Workdays?

The U.S. spends about three times as much on healthcare administration and insurance per capita as Canada. Brookings Institution economist Henry Aaron estimated in 2003 that the U.S. would save more than $213 billion annually in administration and insurance costs if it had a single-payer system similar to that nation’s. Full Story

The Doctor Who Does the Laundry And More Cases of Nonclinical Necessities

Ripley Hollister has been president of his county’s medical society in Colorado Springs and a director of the state’s. He has been a unit commander of the Medical Reserve Corps of El Paso County. Hollister also does the laundry for his medical practice each weeknight: “Is that the way it should be?” he asks. Full Story

Healthy Or Not, You Could Have a Stroke

I recall being silently smug and self-satisfied that I met all seven factors for ideal cardiovascular health at age 60. I convinced myself that, although there are plenty of things that potentially could kill me, heart disease would not be one of them. Then I had a stroke. Full Story