The Dallas Companies Hoping to ‘Uberize’ the Healthcare Staffing

As technology impacts the way healthcare is delivered, it is also changing the way healthcare practices find staff. Two Dallas-based companies are using ride-sharing technology to solve the problem of cumbersome staffing procedures for healthcare facilities and helping solve the nursing shortage.

Sadiant Health hopes to eliminate recruiters, pay nurses more, and charge hospitals less when staffing nurses. When a facility has a shift to fill, they access a list of nurses through Sadiant’s app that allows them to see the certifications and specializations of the nurses, and they can book them accordingly. Because Sadiant cuts out what used to be handled manually with a room full of recruiters and credential validators, those savings can be passed on to the nurses and hospitals.

From the nurse’s perspective, they enter their qualifications (which Sadiant verifies), specialties, how far they are willing to drive and when they are available. They get a notification on their phone about a possible shift, and they can accept or decline.

Sadiant has been picked up by hospitals, clinics, and infusion clinics in Dallas and East Texas, and have over 100 nurses signed up so far.

“We are the future,” says Sadiant CEO Sarah Snetzer. “It sounds to be good to true, but this is the way it should have been all along. Our solution is the future.”

ShiftKey is another Dallas-based healthcare staffing platform that wants to cut out staffing agencies. They include work with nurses, medication aides, and nurse aides seeking to fill part time shifts.

ShiftKey spans Texas, Florida, South Carolina, Tennessee, Missouri, Colorado, Nevada, and Indiana. Health workers and facilities sign onto the website, create a profile, and connect to each other. Co-founders Matt Creason and Tom Ellis created a platform that is user friendly on both ends. Providers can manage their credentials online and even get paid as soon as the next business day via a payment card.

 “The nurses get to bid on the scheduled shifts at healthcare facilities,” Ellis said via release. “They can ultimately choose their own schedules and keep facilities running smoothly.”