Texas Health Dallas Helps Improve Treatment for Cardiogenic Shock

Texas Health Dallas is one of only 60 hospitals in the US, and the only one in Texas, to participate in a study which hopes to improve the survival rates for patients suffering lethal complications after heart attacks.

The initial findings of the study show that 72 percent of patients survive using the new protocols, whereas the typical survival rate from this complication, called cardiogenic shock, has historically hovered around 50 percent. Cardiogenic shock is when the heart cannot pump enough oxygenated blood into the body and is typically caused by damage to cardiac muscle from a heart attack. In this condition, blood cannot effectively reach organs throughout the body because the ability of the left ventricle to pump blood has been compromised.

“We’re committed to this effort to improve outcomes and quality of life for patients who suffer this deadly heart condition,” said Dr. James Park, medical director of Heart & Vascular Services at Texas Health Dallas via release. “These initial results are exciting, but we have to keep working to improve outcomes even more.”

From July 2016 to Feb. 2019, more than 170 patients, including patients from Texas Health Dallas, participated in the national study, contributing to findings presented by the Henry Ford Medical Center researchers.

“For many years, hospitals across the nation have consistently seen a 50 percent survival rate for cardiogenic shock patients, as they tend to be the sickest of all cardiovascular patients,” said Dr. Aurora Estevez, chief medical officer at Texas Health Dallas via release. “We’re hoping these impressive results that we helped cultivate can be shared and implemented across the country—and will lead to further advances in the treatment of this condition.”

With the goal being to further improve survival rates, the study is projected to continue at Texas Health Dallas and other hospitals for at least two more years. Results from the protocol can be found here.