A Breakdown of Tenet’s Sustainability Report

Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare has released its  2011 corporate sustainability report. The company was recognized by Global Report Initiative as meeting GRI’s Application Level C Guidelines, which indicates how many disclosure requirements Tenet achieved in its report. The company believes sustainability is “about creating shared value for our patients, physicians, employees and shareholders” said Trevor Fetter, Tenet president and CEO, in a statement. “This commitment is crucial to our success as a corporation, employer, and steward of the communities in which we serve.” Highlights from Tenet’s report for 2011 include: Tenet gave $530 million in care to the uninsured, paid $126… Full Story

Morning Rounds (09.18.12)

Sleeping in on the weekends doesn’t catch people up on sleep lost during the week, but only makes them sleepier on Monday morning, according to a UT Southwestern study.

Sodium intake in children and teens has reached an alarmingly high rate, according to the American Heart Association, causing high blood pressure to affect more young people.

Women with anorexia nervosa perceive themselves differently than those without, according to a recent study on brain pathways by researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas and UT Southwestern.

The Department of Veterans Affairs’ patient medical records program reached its millionth user last month, two years after its launch. EHR vendors look to this program as they prepare for stage two of the federal program that requires physicians to offer patients the ability to download their health information. Full Story

Sleeping In on Weekends Doesn’t Pay Off “Sleep Debt”

Sleeping in on the weekends doesn’t catch people up on sleep lost during the week, but only makes them sleepier on Monday morning according to a study UT Southwestern released. “A great myth of sleep deprivation is that if we miss sleep over the course of the work week, we need to catch up on an hour-by-hour basis on the weekend,” said Dr. Gregory Carter, a sleep medicine specialist at UT Southwestern Medical Center in a statement. People can delay their circadian clock, up to one hour, by sleeping in one hour or more over the weekend. The problem is… Full Story

Brain Pathways Function Differently in Women with Anorexia

Women with anorexia nervosa perceive themselves differently than those without, according to a recent study on brain pathways by researchers at the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas and UT Southwestern, published in Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. Participants in the study were asked to evaluate three types of assessments: those based on oneself, one’s friend, and “reflected” (what one’s friend believes about the individual). Anorexia patients showed different brain activation than their counterparts, according to the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) results. Dan Krawczyk of the Center for BrainHealth at UT Dallas and UT Southwestern conducted the study along… Full Story

Morning Rounds (09.14.12)

UT Southwestern has been chosen as one of 25 sites for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s Network for Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials, or NeuroNEXT, that may lead them to receive $1.4 million in NINDS aid over the next seven years.

Extended doctors’ office hours are linked to a ten percent dip in healthcare costs for patients, according to an annual government survey.

Medical groups sent a letter to Congress urging lawmakers to halt Medicare provider cuts that, along with the expiration of the sustainable growth rate fix for Medicare are slated to take effect Jan. 1.

The American Heart Association has released a study concluding that mini strokes can lead to serious disability, highlighting that it occurs with conditions that doctors often consider too mild to treat with drugs.

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UT Southwestern Earns Spot in NeuroNEXT Clinical Trials

UT Southwestern has been chosen as one of 25 sites for the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s Network for Excellence in Neuroscience Clinical Trials, or NeuroNEXT. The network will lead clinical trials for brain disease in hopes of making new treatments available faster and minimizing the time and expense of studies. As a result of participation in NeuroNEXT, UT Southwestern expects to receive $1.4 million in NINDS aid over the next seven years. Large patient population, clinical research experience, and multidisciplinary expertise were the factors that went into play when choosing UT Southwestern, according to NINDS associate director for… Full Story

AHA: “Mini Strokes” May Lead to Disability

The American Heart Association’s journal Stroke has released a study concluding that transient ischemic attacks (TIA), or “mini strokes,” can lead to serious disability. The study highlights a condition that doctors often consider too mild to treat with drugs. “Our study shows that TIA and minor stroke patients are at significant risk of disability and need early assessment and treatment,” said Shelagh Coutts, M.D., lead author of the study in a statement. “We should be imaging patients earlier and be more aggressive in treating patients with thrombolysis if we can see a blockage no matter how minor the symptoms are.”… Full Story

Morning Rounds (09.13.12)

The Red Cross has launched its Young Professionals Auxiliary for volunteers ages 21-30 in Dallas.

The American Hospital Association reports that up to 766,000 healthcare and related jobs could be lost by 2021 as a result of the 2 percent sequester of Medicare spending.

Dallas-based Tenet Healthcare has announced a $67 million expansion to its Sierra Providence East Medical Center in El Paso.

All 12 Baylor Health System facilities are eliminating sugar-sweetened sodas and unhealthy snacks from on-site cafés and vending machines, with hopes of setting a healthy example for visitors. Full Story

AHA: Heart Attack Victims Who Take Common Pain Killers May Increase Chance of Death

According to the Dallas-based American Heart Association, heart attack victims who take common painkillers, such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and prescription drugs such as Celebrex, run the risk of suffering a second heart attack, as well as an increased chance of death. “It is important to get the message out to clinicians taking care of patients with cardiovascular disease that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are harmful, even several years after a heart attack,” said Anne-Marie Schjerning Olsen, M.D. at Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte at Denmark, in a statement. In the study, Schjerning Olsen and her colleagues found that 44 percent of patients… Full Story

Morning Rounds (09.06.12)

Parker University will add three degree programs in January as part of a plan to develop 12 new programs through 2017. The programs were chosen in response to high demand among students, an increase in industry salaries, and changes in occupational healthcare trends, the university says.

About 7,000 women in DFW must now find an alternative to Planned Parenthood after the state officially cut its funding because the clinics offer abortions. An appeal of the ruling is under way.

A UT Southwestern medical student was featured on three episodes of “Who Wants to be a Millionaire.” The contestent didn’t win the big prize, but he certainly didn’t go home empty-handed.

Nearly one in three American adults has high blood pressure. The CDC reports that more than half of those people—36 million—don’t have it under control and recommends team-based approaches to help the problem. Full Story