Why Dallas County’s Class Divide Hurts the Economy

The rich are getting richer, the poor are becoming more plentiful, and, as with many things, it’s all bigger in Texas. That’s the takeaway from two recent reports highlighting an ugly backdrop to the American economy—the huge and growing chasm of income inequality. Most people are making less money two years after the Great Recession came to an end, according to the annual American Community Survey from the U.S. Census Bureau, and poverty is at its highest point in nearly 30 years. In 2011, median household income in the United States was $50,502—8 percent less than before the economic collapse… Full Story

The Remarkable Recovery of Lauren Scruggs

A year ago, Dallas-based fashion blogger Lauren Scruggs made headlines when she walked into the spinning propeller of an airplane after a nighttime flight to view Christmas lights. The accident caused her to lose her left eye and hand. Beyond that, Scruggs also experienced some brain damage. Her recovery has exceeded expectations, she tells managing editor Krista Nightengale in the December issue of D: My brain doctor actually said I surpassed the healing of that. It was kind of funny because he’s a doctor, and he’s not extremely emotional, but I’d go in and he was giddy. He’d say, “I can’t… Full Story

Q&A With Rodney Anderson

Plano mortgage banker Rodney Anderson first noticed a problem with medical debt in 2008, after a client’s credit score dropped 105 points due to a $150 medical collection. Looking into the situation, Anderson found that 40 percent of Americans have some sort of medical debt on their record—and most don’t know it. Whether the debt is $100 or $1,000, it shaves roughly 100 points off an individual’s credit score—and takes seven years to go away. Anderson has relentlessly lobbied Congress to shave that seven-year waiting period to 45 days through the proposed Medical Debt Responsibility Act and says he has invested… Full Story

Concentra’s “Country Doctor”

Thomas Fogarty, MD, will turn 65 in December. The chief medical officer of Concentra, the nation’s largest operator of urgent-care and occupational health clinics, shrugs off the milestone. “As long as I am having fun, I’m going to keep doing what I’m doing,” he says. Fogarty was one of three founders of Addison-based Concentra. He was a Houston-based industrial engineer when he decided to go to medical school at Texas Tech University School of Medicine. He spent his fourth year of medical school in his hometown of Amarillo, where Concentra was born in 1970, when he and two other physicians… Full Story

Behind the Gates of Old Parkland

In reporting on commercial real estate in North Texas for the past dozen years or so, I’ve seen some impressive projects—Dallas developers are among the most talented in the nation. But the first time I truly felt “wowed” was when I drove through the gates of Old Parkland a few months back. I knew, of course, that Crow Holdings had renovated the historic Old Parkland hospital at Maple and Oak Lawn avenues and moved its company to the 60,000-square-foot facility in 2008. I knew that Chairman and CEO Harlan Crow had also renovated a former nurses quarters on the site… Full Story

Behind the Gates at Old Parkland

In reporting on commercial real estate in North Texas for the past dozen years or so, I’ve seen some impressive projects—Dallas developers are among the most talented in the nation. But the first time I truly felt “wowed” was when I drove through the gates of Old Parkland a few months back. I knew, of course, that Crow Holdings had renovated the historic Old Parkland hospital at Maple and Oak Lawn avenues and moved its company to the 60,000-square-foot facility in 2008. I knew that Chairman and CEO Harlan Crow had also renovated a former nurses quarters on the site… Full Story

Diabetes: A Growing Threat

Michael Kelly found himself in an emergency department with unbearable shoulder pain. Tests revealed a more serious problem: out-of-control diabetes. The 50-year-old Kelly, who works part-time for a Dallas pest-control company, knew he was diabetic a decade earlier. But he lacked health insurance to treat it consistently, so he just lived with it. “I would see a doctor once every blue moon when I had money or I had no choice,” he says. “But I didn’t have money for test strips [for blood glucose] or to eat right. The cost is astronomical.” Kelly was referred to the Diabetes Health and… Full Story

The Best Pediatricians in Dallas 2012

In its debut issue, D Moms presents D Magazine’s list of the area’s best doctors for children, as chosen by their peers. Here’s a look at the methodology behind the selection process, with a link to the complete roster for 2012. How does D Magazine determine which doctors make the list? Best Pediatric Specialists is a peer-review voting process. We rely on the doctors’ expertise to determine who deserves to be on the list, just like a doctor would recommend a patient to a specialist. This year, we mailed letters to 2,339 local pediatric specialists, family medicine doctors, and gynecologists/obstetricians… Full Story

The Most Interesting Neurosurgeon in the World

Someone should make a television show based on the life of Dr. Duke Samson. America would love a character like this. He’s 6-foot-2 but seems several inches taller. He embodies his name, Duke, as if one of John Wayne’s characters had grown up to be a doctor. At 69, he walks with the swagger of a West Texan, sometimes reviewing cases with a cigar in his mouth, casually calling people he’s just met Ace. His voice is deep, gentle, almost always calm and measured, but it’s often said that he doesn’t suffer fools gladly. Maybe the TV show is set… Full Story

DFW Hospital CEO Roundtable: A New Model for Healthcare

According to the late management guru Peter Drucker, being the chief executive officer of a hospital is one of the most difficult jobs in America. And with the unprecedented changes brought on by healthcare reform, the growing demand for service, a continuing squeeze on payments, and evolving technology, the job isn’t getting any easier. D CEO recently gathered together the heads of five major Dallas-Fort Worth hospital systems to discuss the challenges they face—in an economic sector that comprises about 17 percent of the local economy. Combined, these top executives oversee nearly 70,000 North Texas employees. 

Participating in the discussion were… Full Story