Cook Children’s Heads North With Prosper Pediatric Hospital

The battle for northern suburb healthcare supremacy continues, as Cook Children’s will soon expand with a new pediatric hospital in Prosper. The 23-acre campus will be called Cook Children’s Medical Center North, and is already under construction. Cook Children’s already operates several primary care offices in Denton County and Prosper, but the medical center will allow the system to better serve the growing population in the northern suburbs. The center will add primary and urgent care this fall, and an outpatient surgery center, an outpatient specialty center with imaging and lab services in the spring of 2020. Looking further ahead,… Full Story

Hospitals Now Have to Post Their Prices, But is That a Good Thing?

A federal law that requires hospitals to post their prices went into effect yesterday, moving toward the transparency that consumers are likely to say they desire. But the complicated system of who pays for healthcare may lead to more confusion. The new law requires hospitals to post their price for standard charges, but because insurance companies negotiate with providers on the price they will pay for an operation, many say the “price” that is posted will be meaningless. In addition, each consumer’s insurance plan will impact what the person actually pays for a procedure. In addition, patient health can cause… Full Story

How Does the State’s New Rating System for NICUs Work?

Five years ago, Texas lawmakers passed a law that required hospital neonatal intensive care units to receive a rating from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. After lawmakers passed an implementation delay in 2015 to iron out the details, the ratings were finalized this year. Based on the new ratings system, North Texas is home to many of the highest-rated, level IV NICUs. With guidance from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the legislature passed a series of requirements for each level of NICU care, which range from more or less healthy newborns in level I to the most critically… Full Story

Stamford Hospital Falls Victim To CMS Rule That Caused Hurst Facility To Change Course

Stamford Memorial Hospital ended all inpatient care and shut down its emergency room last week, citing an average daily census that has dipped to just 0.48 so far in 2018, as KTXS reports. The new requirement to be considered a hospital by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services—put into place late last year—is two. Stamford is a couple hours drive west from DFW, but I point this out because I’ve followed the rule change in this space previously. In February, Hurst-based Cook Children’s Northeast Hospital announced it would be closing down as a hospital and re-opening as an ambulatory… Full Story

Microhospitals Have Become Part of the North Texas Healthcare Equation, But Will Some Feel The Heat from A CMS Survey Change?

Toward the end of February, Cook Children’s announced that it would close Cook Children’s Northeast Hospital and turn it into an ambulatory surgical center. The system determined that, as it’s currently operating, the Hurst-based facility would no longer meet the definition of a hospital under the tweaked guidance issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services late last year. The guidance says that to be defined as a hospital—more precisely, to get a foot in the door so that CMS can evaluate your merits by various other criteria—a facility must have an average daily overnight census of at least… Full Story