Amid Agency’s Struggles, CEO of Dallas County’s Largest Mental Health Provider Gets One-Year Contract

The Metrocare Services Board of Trustees renewed the contract of its chief executive officer for one year on Thursday afternoon, without a raise in salary but with the possibility of a bonus of up to $50,000. Dr. John Burruss will remain the agency’s leader amid its financial struggles and after a lengthy CEO evaluation process. The board will have discretion to grant the bonus and decide its amount, Board President Terry James said Thursday. Burruss makes a salary of $382,347 and has received two $50,000 bonuses in the last three years. Burruss’ three-year contract as CEO was set to expire… Full Story

Metrocare Board Likely To Decide CEO’s Fate This Week

The lengthy evaluation process of Metrocare Services CEO John Burruss will conclude at the agency’s board meeting on Thursday, and a decision about Burruss’ fate will likely follow. The closed-door executive session will include discussion on the “conclusion of CEO evaluation process and potential CEO contract renewal.” There’s an opportunity for the board to take action after executive session if need be. The behavioral health agency—Dallas County’s largest mental health provider, serving more than 57,000 adults and children annually—has for months been grappling with whether to extend the contract of its top executive amid the agency’s financial struggles. Burruss’ three-year… Full Story

Ten Days Before Its CEO’s Contract Expires, Dallas’ Largest Provider of Mental Health Services Is Silent

Ten days before the contract of its chief executive officer is set to run out, Dallas-based Metrocare Services is staying mum on the topic of its leadership future. The government agency—which has a budget north of $100 million and a board appointed by Dallas County Commissioners—has not answered repeated inquiries about the CEO process or about financial issues at the agency. It’s a spell of silence that dates back more than three months. In the most recent instance showcasing the lack of transparency that government agencies are expected to offer, Metrocare denied a records request seeking “minutes”—the play-by-play—from its most… Full Story

Before Layoffs, Clinic Closure, Metrocare Quietly Issued CEO A Two-Month Extension

Metrocare Services and CEO John Burruss have inked a short-term contract extension while the Dallas County behavioral health agency considers a longer term deal. Metrocare and Burruss agreed on the deal in late March, extending Burruss’ contract through June 30, according to documents obtained through an open records request. The contract had been set to expire on April 28. The largest mental health provider in Dallas County, Metrocare has had a difficult last 18 months, including the recent news that it will lay off more than 40 people, close a clinic, and freeze salaries for executives, administrators, and managers. In… Full Story

Dallas County’s Struggling Mental Health Provider will Implement Layoffs, a Clinic Closure, and a Salary Freeze

Metrocare Services will lay off more than 40 people and close another clinic as Dallas County’s largest purveyor of mental health services tries to steady itself after a financially torrid 2017. Metrocare CEO Dr. John Burruss notified staff on Monday in an email. He said executive, administrative, and management salaries also will be frozen “for the foreseeable future.” According to a source close to the company, the number of people impacted by layoffs could be as many as 60. That would be about 7 percent of Metrocare’s 900 employees. The agency serves more than 57,000 people and is budgeted to… Full Story

Despite Turnover, Red Ink, and Other Issues, CEO Says Metrocare Services Has Been ‘Enormously Successful’

Dallas County’s largest provider of mental health services sold its software division at a significant loss, divested properties, and saw at least two high-ranking executives head for the exits during a financially tumultuous stretch over the last year. The financial situation got so bad at Metrocare Services that, for a time, the agency ran out of prescription stock and had to send patients elsewhere, the result of vendor relationships put on pause due to the agency’s inability to pay. The difficulties at Metrocare, a government agency that serves more than 57,000 people at various facilities across the county, stemmed from… Full Story